Discover the best selection of paper products from around the world!

Archive | Art Supply RSS feed for this section

GIVEAWAY: Let Your Creativity Flow with Stillman & Birn Art Journals! [Closed]

5 Jun

We’ve got three fabulous Stillman & Birn art journals to give away to our loyal followers! (Please read through all the contest details at the bottom of this post before entering!)

Each sketchbook is 6 by 8 inches with pH neutral paper. They vary in their paper weight and purpose, but each has internal and surface sizing that provides exceptional wet strength, and is compatible with precision erasing techniques. Best of all, the heavy-duty binder boards are incredibly tough and will protect your sketches, paintings, and more while resisting warpage. If you’re looking for the best in sketchbooks, look no further than Stillman & Birn!

And the three art journals to give away are …

Stillman & Birn Alpha Side Spiralbound Sketchbook
  • Media: Dry & Light Washes
  • Vellum Finish
  • Natural White
  • 150 gsm (100 lb) Paper
Stillman & Birn Alpha Side Spiralbound Sketchbook (6 x 8) on EuropeanPaper.com

Stillman & Birn Alpha Side Spiralbound Sketchbook on EuropeanPaper.com

~~~
Stillman & Birn Beta Side Spiralbound Sketchbook
  • Ideal for Multi-media Renderings
  • Rough Paper Surface
  • Natural White
  • 270 gsm (180 lb) Paper
Stillman & Birn Beta Side Spiralbound Sketchbook (6 x 8) on EuropeanPaper.com

Stillman & Birn Beta Side Spiralbound Sketchbook on EuropeanPaper.com

~~~
Stillman & Birn Epsilon Side Spiralbound Sketchbook
  • Best for Pen & Ink Drawings
  • Plate Finish
  • Natural White
  • 150 gsm (100 lb) Paper
Stillman & Birn Epsilon Side Spiralbound Sketchbook (6 x 8) on EuropeanPaper.com

Stillman & Birn Epsilon Side Spiralbound Sketchbook on EuropeanPaper.com

~~~

Contest Details:

  • This giveaway is only open to U.S. residents.
  • Entry deadline is Friday, June 8, 2012 at noon MST.
  • Three random winners will be selected and announced on Monday, June 11, 2012 at noon MST.
  • You have three chances to enter (see details below).

How to Enter:

  • Comment on this blog post and tell us which sketchbook you prefer and what you would do with it!
  • Tweet the following: @StillmanandBirn art journal #giveaway on @EuroPaper’s blog! http://wp.me/p2cRT5-Nu
  • Snap a pic of some of your artwork (finished or in process) on Instagram and tag it with the following when you upload it: @StillmanandBirn art journal #giveaway on @EuroPaper’s blog! http://wp.me/p2cRT5-Nu

Earth Day Sketch Contest Winner + Submissions

21 Apr

Thanks to everyone who entered the giveaway and spread the word! We’ve got loads more giveaways, articles, tips & tricks, etc. on the way, so check back frequently. To keep in the loop, follow us on Twitterlike us on Facebook, subscribe to our RSS feed, and/or sign up for our weekly newsletter.

If you have any ideas or feedback, definitely let us know in a comment on this blog, or you can email us at info@europeanpaper.com!

Our #EarthDay Sketch Contest Ends Tonight!

18 Apr

Our Earth Day Sketch Contest ends tonight! If you haven’t entered yet, check out the details below, and get your sketch in before midnight!

Enter our Earth Day Sketch Contest with one sketch / drawing of your choice that you feel embodies Earth Day. It can be literal or abstract, colorful or black & white. We want to see them all!

Scan your sketch or take a photo of it, and email it in a jpeg format to info@europeanpaper.com by April 18, 2012.

Please include your name, valid email address, and any commentary on your sketch you want to include.

The winner will be announced April 21 and will receive the following:

  • Cretacolor Black Box 20pc Drawing Charcoal & Pencil Set
    •  This drawing set includes ten different charcoals. It also includes two Monolith pencils, 6B and 9B, and six Nero pencils, unique drawing tools that combine natural waxes and black chalk to produce a smooth, glossy water-resistant line in rich black. The sleek 7.5×7.5 inch tin also provides an eraser and blender.
  • Stillman & Birn Delta Series Spiralbound Sketchbook (7 x 7 in.)
    • With 180 lb (270 gsm) extra heavy weight ivory paper.

*By submitting your photo, you confirm you own the rights to it, it is of your own work, and you give us permission to use it on our website or in any marketing material for European Paper Company.

 

How to Put Stationery Leftovers to Good Use

12 Apr

It never fails: You near the end of a box of your favorite stationery only to discover that you’re left with several pages but no envelopes. Or a stack of extra envelopes and no notecards. Throwing out the extras seems wasteful, especially if you love the stationery. So what can you do with your stationery leftovers?

Vision Board

Combine those leftover pieces of stationery with inspiring images torn out of magazines and catalogs. Gather up all your favorite scraps, a big sheet of craft paper, some glue, and markers. Collaging is a great creative outlet and can be done just for fun or with a theme in mind. Identifying a focus for your vision board and putting it down on paper will literally help you envision achieving a specific goal or what you hope for the future.

Kids’ Crafts

Collect all your stationery leftovers in a folder for your kids to use in their arts and crafts. To avoid itty bitty pieces of scrap paper everywhere, challenge them to make something specific. For example, folding envelopes into a bouquet of flowers, create a mail art letter to Grandma, or allow their imaginations to run wild with sculpting a new toy out of paper.

Donate to Schools

Did you know many teachers spend their own money to stock their classrooms with art supplies? Help a teacher while helping local kids be creative. Take your scrap stash or pile of envelopes to an appreciative teacher. If you don’t personally know a teacher, call the elementary school near you and ask for the name of their art teacher. He or she will know exactly how to put those scraps to use!

Journal Makeover

Spice up your Moleskine by taping colorful or printed stationery scraps onto the border of your journal or calendar pages. If you have a large amount of scraps to use, grab a blank journal and start an art-specific journal to house your inspirations and make it your ideal creative outlet. Don’t stop there – use stamps, fun tape, and anything else you’ve got to jazz it up.

Easy DIY Wall Art

If you love the design of your stationery, upcycle it into easy wall art. Simply frame the notecard or page and hang. Depending on the design, you can also cut out portions to frame. Or, trim a single design into thirds, frame each third separately, and hang them together as a group. If you don’t want to shell out for a new frame, use spray mount to adhere the scraps to a piece of posterboard or even construction paper. For the super eco-crafty, super glue scraps of wood or PVC to make your own reclaimed frame.

Mix-and-match

If you have leftover envelopes from one set and stationery from another, try to fold the stationery in a clever way to fit the envelopes. For instance, instead of folding stationery in thirds by width, fold it in thirds lengthwise to fit a narrower envelope. Or if you want to get really creative, try out some basic origami shapes.

Messages

Trim leftovers down to the size of a standard sticky note, or roughly 3 by 3 inches. Place the stack near the telephone, and use them for taking and delivering messages – so much prettier than a dry erase board! Use the same scraps as idea scratch paper or to scrawl a love note that you can slip into your partner’s coat pocket or in between the pages of a book he or she is reading. Adjust the trim size to long and thin, and write inspirational quotes to put on your fridge or bulletin board.

~~~

 Meet the Writer:Maggie Marton is a freelance writer who lives in Bloomington, Indiana, with her husband and their three darling dogs. View more of Maggie’s work at MaggieMarton.com

~~~

Sketching with Stillman & Birn

11 Apr

Shop Stillman & Birn Sketchbooks on EuropeanPaper.com

For artists of all ilk, we’ve got you covered with Stillman & Birn’s premium sketchbooks. Capture your work for years to come on Stillman & Birn’s archival-grade sketchbook paper where you can let your creativity flow in a variety of media.

S&B History

Stillman & Birn Alpha Hardbound Sketchbook (5.5 x 8.5)

Stillman & Birn Alpha Hardbound Sketchbook 5.5 x 8.5

Founded in 1958 by Philip Birn, a preeminent Viennese bookbinder who pioneered the concept of the traditional hardbound sketchbook, Stillman & Birn inspires artists with their focus on high quality sketch paper. Upon cracking open a new Stillman & Birn sketchbook, you’ll instantly feel the difference in the weight and tooth of the paper. Acknowledging the importance of sketchbooks in art history, Stillman & Birn support the evolution of the sketchbook with “true art paper” as they call it, meaning it can withstand multiple erasures, it’s suitable for precision work, and has internal and surface sizing to provide durability.

With both hardbound and spiralbound sketchbooks, Stillman & Birn offers you a platform for expression in either dry or wet media with their sketchbooks. Use colored pencils, ballpoint or rollerball pens, fountain pens with wet ink, watercolor, pencil, and much more.

Sketching in the Present

Stillman & Birn Gamma Side Spiralbound Sketchbook (6 x 8)

Stillman & Birn Gamma Side Spiralbound Sketchbook 6 x 8

Re-established in December 2010, the new Stillman & Birn organization is led by Birn’s nephew, Michael Kalman and his partner Oscar Hernandez, both with many years of expertise in sketchbook manufacturing. Kalman and Hernandez have revived S&B’s original mantra of “Paper Matters … Feel the Difference!”

Whether you use your sketchbook to jot down ideas and doodles, or for recording your art pieces, Stillman & Birn puts the choice in your hands so you can pick the ideal sketchbook for your art: white or ivory paper, heavy (150 gsm) or extra heavy (270 gsm) weight paper, and the three options of vellum, rough, or plate paper.

Stillman & Birn’s 5 Premium Sketchbook Series:

  • Alpha Series – 100 lb./150 gsm – White – Vellum Surface
  • Beta Series – 180 lb./270 gsm – White – Multi-media Surface
  • Gamma Series – 100 lb./150 gsm – Ivory – Vellum Surface
  • Delta Series – 180 lb./270 gsm – Ivory – Multi-media Surface
  • Epsilon Series – 100 lb./150 gsm – White – Plate Surface (smooth)

Bound in the USA with heavy-duty binder boards that resist warping, each sketchbook stands out as unique and robust – perfect for artists who care about their paper quality. You can always be confident you’ve got the best, when you’ve got a Stillman & Birn sketchbook.

Earth Day Sketch Contest!

7 Apr

Celebrate Earth Day with European Paper Co. by entering our sketch contest!

Enter our Earth Day Sketch Contest with one sketch / drawing of your choice that you feel embodies Earth Day. It can be literal or abstract, colorful or black & white. We want to see them all!

Scan your sketch or take a photo of it, and email it in a jpeg format to info@europeanpaper.com by April 18, 2012.

Please include your name, valid email address, and any commentary on your sketch you want to include.

The winner will be announced April 21 and will receive the following:

  • Cretacolor Black Box 20pc Drawing Charcoal & Pencil Set
    •  This drawing set includes ten different charcoals. It also includes two Monolith pencils, 6B and 9B, and six Nero pencils, unique drawing tools that combine natural waxes and black chalk to produce a smooth, glossy water-resistant line in rich black. The sleek 7.5×7.5 inch tin also provides an eraser and blender.
  • Stillman & Birn Delta Series Spiralbound Sketchbook (7 x 7 in.)
    • With 180 lb (270 gsm) extra heavy weight ivory paper.

*By submitting your photo, you confirm you own the rights to it, it is of your own work, and you give us permission to use it on our website or in any marketing material for European Paper Company.

 

Fountain Pen Water Painting

27 Mar

Isn’t it great when you find a new use for something? For those of us who love (and purchase) nice pens, it’s especially great because it makes your already valuable tools even more valuable. 

The particular use I’m going to share with you today works with any fountain pen no matter how expensive (or inexpensive) it may be. And for those of you with a creative aptitude, you’ll really like this.

Fountain Pen Water Painting is a very simple technique. Draw a line with your fountain pen, inked with a favorite color of course, and then come along with a wet brush to make it bleed.

It creates a lovely effect and really highlights your inks.

In the images of the orange flower, I’m using a Lamy Safari Fountain Pen with a Fine nib and Diamine Ink in Pumpkin. I’m using a Kuretake Waterbrush, but you can use any water brush and for that matter, any paintbrush at all. What makes a waterbrush nice is that you can house the water in the barrel of the brush itself.

 

Do you see in the progression of the flower being colored in how much variation there is in the color of the ink? This technique really gives a lot of dimension to the piece and it looks lovely too.

I stumbled into this technique a few years ago. It was spring and I was sitting outside with some postcard-sized pieces of cardstock, a fountain pen and a waterbrush. I drew a simple outline of a manatee and then ran back over the lines with my water brush. The ink didn’t bleed, but rather I was able to spread the ink around to exactly the spot I wanted it. My simple line drawing of a manatee became a nicely shaded illustration in just a few seconds with very few tools.

Here’s the original manatee, it was done with a LAMY Safari as well and I used Diamine ink in Damson.

This method became my method of choice as time went on. All I needed was paper, a fountain pen (which I already carried in my purse) and a water brush. No need for paintbrushes, cups of water, mixing dishes, blotting towels … the simplicity of the technique and the portability of the items needed is what has kept me coming back.

This technique lends itself well to lettering. The effect created when you add a little water to ink is beautiful. I’ve used this on the front of notecards myself and I always surprise the recipient when I tell them it’s just a little ink and water and a few minutes of time.

Here is the front of a notecard. Just lines.

Now, with my waterbrush, I trace over the letters. And I go over the letters once more, making them even thicker.

This technique can include actual watercolors too. You follow the same procedure as above, except you fill in or highlight specific areas with watercolors, acrylics, inks, marker or otherwise. Don’t be afraid to add more than one additional color.

Aside from being fun, this technique is incredibly relaxing. Since you don’t have to fuss with many materials, your focus can entirely be on the illustration. And for those of you who enjoy scrapbooking, journaling or writing letters, you can probably see how the addition of a waterbrush might be a worthwhile one. The options are as endless as your inks!

~~~

Meet the Writer: Cole Imperi is a business owner and a proponent of the handwritten word. When not at Doth Brands, a Branding & Identity firm catering to the health, wellness & deathcare professions where Cole works as Owner and Creative Director, you might find her on her yoga mat teaching yoga or behind a laptop writing for Simplicity Embellished, a letter-writing and lifestyle blog.

~~~

 

New Brands on the Horizon

15 Feb

We’re opening the doors wide and are looking into all kinds of new brands to bring onto EuropeanPaper.com. We want to know what YOU are dying to get your hands on. Choose one or more of the brands listed, or add another we haven’t thought of – all are welcome!

 

Traveling “Outside of Myself” with a Moleskine Journal

15 Nov

Amy Rudberg sketchbook pages on EuropeanPaper.com

A sampling of pages from Rudberg's art journal.

One day I received an envelope from the Art House Co-op, which owns and manages The Brooklyn Art Library gallery in New York. I had applied to participate in their annual Sketchbook Project, which allows people from all over the world to create their writing and art in “sketchbooks.” Expecting an artist’s book with thick pages, I was surprised to find a small blank Moleskine journal in the envelope.

Since I had never completed a full artist’s book before, I needed inspiration—some creative spark—to get started. Created in the 1990s, Moleskine was based on the iconic black hardcover journals used by famous artists and writers, such as van Gogh, Picasso, and Hemingway, in their travels. Like these artists, I could showcase my work in a journal, but unlike them, my travels would take place in my imagination.

I stared at the journal and thought about how I was going to create my art in about half the size I was used to working with (this Moleskine was 5 x 8.25 inches). I could use any medium as long as the journal maintained the same dimensions when closed. (Some people in the past got around this restriction by creating poster-size pages that worked like fold-out maps.) I was determined to honor the tradition of using the Moleskine as a journal and not as an altered book.

The journal itself—a large plain Cahier—was simply a cardboard cover with stitching down the spine, and 40 blank sheets (80 pages) inside. On the front inside cover was an “Art House Library” pocket, with an inserted card. The card said “Shh… this is a library.” My name, location, a theme that I selected from a list (“Outside of myself”), barcode, and online location for my journal were printed on the inside back cover.

The inside cover of Rudberg's art journal.

I named the journal “Beside Myself” with the subtitle “modern life, nature, and everything else in between.” I wanted to review and provide commentary on what I had learned so far about art and life. I would pretend to be my doppelgänger looking over my shoulder while I worked.

I created a series of drawings and gave them playful names such as: my brain on art; unisex head and Warhol sketch; my favorite soap and emoto phone; one continuous puzzle and protection against the evil eye; heart is where the home is and heart coral; life is a maze and play the game of life; and odd couple Norma Desmond and Bozo the Clown.

In this journal, I included a range of media: prints, etchings, screenprints, and mixed-media art, using ink, colored pencils, paint, digital media, glue, tape, and acrylic medium. I then applied a fixative spray to each page so that the pages would not stick together. The pages remained intact and sturdy no matter what I did with them.

As I worked with my journal, I noticed that it was developing into a living thing – a personification of my creativity and an expression of my inner spirit. It was a sad day when I had to mail back my Moleskine journal, but I knew that it would continue to live on in my heart and in the “cloud.”

~~~

Meet the Writer: Amy A. Rudberg is a freelance writer/blogger and artist who lives and works in Chicago. Her interests include papermaking, printmaking, mixed media, and digital art.

~~~