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Link Love: Productivity Tips & Resolutions Help for the New Year

18 Jan

We could all use a bit of a boost this time of the month. Resolutions were made, and perhaps are not as present in your mind as they were right after New Year’s, so take a moment to peruse the links for inspiration, motivation, and a brief moment to relax and read!

Lost Coast Post: How To Complete a 365 Challenge

FastCompany: 11 Productivity Hacks From Super-Productive People

365 Letters: 2013 Letter Writing Topics

Forbes: Ten Resolutions The Most Successful People Make And Then Keep

Plannerisms: Fitting your Goals into your Schedule

Frugal Guidance: Use Evernote to Remember ANYTHING, Frugally

Recording Thoughts: Super Simple GTD Approach For Traveler’s Notebook

Lifehack: 10 Things You Need to Learn to Live a Super Happy Life (h/t Ms.Logica)

Kaizen Journaling: 45 Things You Can Write In Your Journal

A Penchant for Paper: My Productivity System

Perfect Productivity Tools: Rhodia A4 Meeting Book (All-in-one Efficiency)

16 Jan

Productivity Tools for Everyday Life brought to you by EuropeanPaper.com - Rhodia A4 Meeting Notebook

Rhodia Side Spiralbound A4 Meeting Book (9 x 11.75) on EuropeanPaper.com

Small Business Expenses Solution: The Moleskine Daily Planner Set

11 Jan

I’m always trying to balance the digital part of my life with my penchant for low-tech, traditional paper and pen. As a freelance writer and web content marketer, that means I’ve tried just about every system coming and going – both digital and paper.

No matter what I do, I end up at the end of the year, sorting through receipts, checking all my notebooks for scribbles on mileage and lunch meetings, and scouring my email for automatic payments on business bills. It’s humbling, if not downright depressing. It also takes three or four days and I’m in such a foul mood everyone cuts me a HUGE path. For years, “I’m working on taxes” was the only thing I could say that would actually strike terror into my children and make them quiet and cautious.

For 2013, I’m taking a new path. I’m going to use the 2013 Moleskine Daily Planner Set.

Moleskine 2013 Daily Planner Box Set on EuropeanPaper.com

Moleskine 2013 Daily Planner Box Set on EuropeanPaper.com

More to Love; Less to Carry

I like keeping a notebook with me all the time to capture ideas, snippets of conversations, and general information I may need to reference later. The problem is, I usually go out without what I need because I don’t like to carry too much when I leave the house. The smaller size of a pocket planner solves that as it is small enough to fit in my purse (so I’ll always have it with me), yet big enough for my ideas to fill it up before returning it to the binder set.

Why This Will Work

The Moleskine Daily Planner Set meets my needs beautifully by giving me a new daily planner each month with a full page per day for jotting down mileage AS it’s HAPPENING in one place, automatic payments that hit my account, automatic withdrawals to pay bills, who I meet for a business lunch and what we discuss, and I can even record those little office supplies I pick up while I’m out doing personal shopping.

I only wish each month had the expandable pocket in the back to hold those pesky little receipts that are so easy to lose. Since they don’t come with one, I’ll be adding them to each volume myself.

Once the month is over, I’ll return the book to the binder and take out a new one. At the end of the year, I’ll have a complete set outlining my year in business in one convenient place. And I’ll have a written record should I ever get audited (without having to scour my computer system and pull together old files).

My income tracking is handled online (I use Cashboard and love it). I can pull a year-end report and have all the invoicing and payment information in a flash because I do all my billing through that one online system and all my clients pay online. It’s the little expenses here and there, the daily stuff, that make me crazy. I’m confident the Moleskine Daily Planner Set should solve the problem.

Why My Other Systems Didn’t Work

I like a paper version of bookkeeping records – it’s faster to jot down expenses than to power up a computer and open a program to do it – but never could remember to carry my record book with me everywhere (and didn’t want to, since it was so big). I’d also forget to log items when I returned to the office, meaning I’d lose business expenses deductions every year to my faulty system. It also means I always felt like I was playing “catch up.”

I’ve tried phone apps and tablet apps and computer apps. They were always too time-intensive to set up, too awkward to use on the run, or too focused in their application (meaning they would only track mileage and I’d have to open another app to do meals and another to do miscellaneous business expenses like office supplies, professional subscriptions and equipment). The few that showed promise invariably crashed and lost several months worth of data that cost me more time to recover and/or research all over again than they were worth. It also made my language get a little too colorful for comfort. Granted, today’s digital systems and “cloud” backups mean this happens less, but I’ve been burned too many times, now. No thank you.

What I need is a single, portable place to dump and store all my information. I love the fact that this page-a-day format will eliminate my need to write the date of each purchase. I know that’s a little thing, but it irks me. With these monthly volumes, I’ll jot down what it was, how much it was, and where I bought it – and list the project if it’s for a specific client – then slip the receipt in the (soon to be) homemade back pocket.

I Want a SIMPLE System

I can’t wait to get my set to begin my new system. It’s currently on order so I can start the year right – and of course the planner set will be the first items listed in my business expenses for January! I’m going to be so organized and efficient this year! (And I won’t have to lug around a huge book to accomplish it – just a single slender monthly volume.)

The ONLY thing that could make it better would be a built-in back pocket per notebook and access to a set that was varying shades of purple instead of rainbow colors … but that’s just me.

~~~

Meet the Writer: Angela Allen has been creating online content for small business clients since 1999, when she had to use a painfully slow dial-up connection. Now, she specializes in real estate topics and organic content marketing for entrepreneurs on a gloriously high speed connection. When she’s not writing for WickedWriter.com clients, she enjoys the discipline of living small in her high-tech cabin deep in the woods of Kentucky, blogging on WickedBlog, and enjoying the pure tactile titillation of going “old-school” and writing with a fountain pen on luxury paper.

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Editor’s Note: Shopping for a 2013 Daily Planner? Discover all available 2013 day-per-page datebooks here. Prefer weekly or monthly formats? We’ve got those too for 2013: All Weekly 2013 Planners and All 2013 Monthly Planners.

Blogroll: Our Top 6 Most Fabulous & Informative Blog Posts of 2012

5 Jan

How to Write: A Letter of Resignation

  • Resigning from something – whether it’s a job or a volunteer position with a local non-profit – is an occasion that should be given some care and attention. In most cases, your letter of resignation will be kept on file permanently and is something that could potentially resurface in the future. Here are a few essential components to any good resignation letter and a few best practices as well.

How to Write: Sympathy Notes

  • Sympathy Notes really get a lot of scrutiny from the recipient. A  sympathy note is a reminder that the recipient has many people in his or her life to help fill in that empty spot. There are lots of things you can say in a sympathy note, most of which are probably fine. However, there are a few things you should avoid saying in a sympathy note and I’ll tell you why.

How to Write With a Fountain Pen

  • No matter what fountain pen you have; whether it’s a $2 drugstore find or a $1,000 special edition, it’s important to understand what the tool was designed for so you use it properly. It’s also useful to find other people who use fountain pens and ask them for their tips and advice. That said, here are my tips for how to write with fountain pens.

How to Write: Improving Your Cursive Skills

  • Cursive is a word that basically just means the letters are joined. So, whether your cursive is bubbly and wide or teeny and scratchy; as long as those letters are connected, you, my friend, are writing in cursive. Here are my best tips for improving your cursive.

How to Write: Friendship / Appreciation Notes

  • Friendship and Appreciation notes are a special kind of personal correspondence and are always treasured by the recipient. They can be a challenge to write because they require the expression of honest, heartfelt emotion and sentiment when we, at least Americans, don’t normally do that. Start to change that with this post!

How to Write: Thank You Notes

  • Thank you notes do not serve the purpose of simply naming (and sometimes also describing) a gift someone sent you. This post in the How To Write series is meant to help you write thank you notes well. And we begin by understanding one subtle difference: a thank you note is different from just a thank you. They are not one and the same.
Click the image below for even more How to Write blog posts in the series, and enjoy!
Read more of our How to Write blog post series

Find Your Perfect Planner for 2013 on EuropeanPaper.com

2 Dec

Find Your Perfect Planner for 2013 on EuropeanPaper.com

 

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Guest Post: Seeing the Whitelines at the End of the Tunnel

15 Nov

Shop all Whitelines Notebooks on EuropeanPaper.com - Image courtesy of guest blogger Kaylee B. at Whitelines

Have you ever been writing in your journal or notebook and noticed the disturbance of the lines? One of the biggest downfalls of customary paper is that the lines on the paper are simply too prominent. Don’t get me wrong, I am in no way lessening the importance of the lines, as I am a huge neat freak when it comes to writing. I like everything clean and readable and straight. However, when looking at writings and drawings on traditional paper, the text looks anything but clean. After putting things down on paper, the lines’ assistance completely goes away and they become more of a limitation than an asset. Enter Whitelines.

For so long we have simply accepted traditional writing paper without questioning the fact that the lines of the paper, created to provide a foundation for your writing and drawings, acts as an interference forcing your thoughts and ideas to compete with the lines of the paper for attention.

Years ago Olof Hansson, the founder of Whitelines, was doing sketches of a new invention of his. Annoyed by the dark lines disturbing his creation, Olof became astutely aware of the hindrance of customary writing paper. He set out on a mission to create paper that did not impose limitations.

The obvious solution to this problem was to take the dark element out of writing paper. Still desiring the support and functionality of lines, Olof turned to a slightly colored paper with white lines. Quickly Olof found that not only did these two light elements provide a solid foundation for both note-taking and drawing and provide a strong contrast between the paper and the writing, but the paper also gave an enhanced reading and writing experience. The eye and the brain, without having to decipher between the writing and the lines of the paper, can process the information more effortlessly, making it easier on the eyes. Additionally, the gray tone of the paper delivers less glare. Whitelines was born in January of 2006.

Shop all Whitelines Notebooks on EuropeanPaper.com - Image courtesy of guest blogger Kaylee B. at Whitelines

Regular paper on the left, Whitelines paper on the right. Image courtesy of guest blogger Kaylee B.

 

Whitelines paper is for all those that want a supportive writing paper. The reason Whitelines is so popular among so many groups of people is because the paper makes the writing and reading process more pleasant for everyone. Students find note-taking and organization much more agreeable. People in the office place enjoy the ability to scan and fax the paper with the lines disappearing leaving only their writing. And the creative folks – they just get it. No longer do their drawings and creations have to fight with the constraints of traditional writing paper.

So go ahead and give it a try. Test out the paper for yourself to experience a writing experience without limitations. A bit of a forewarning: once you start using Whitelines paper, it’s difficult to go back to the distracting lines of traditional writing paper. With so many options to choose from (Hard Covers, Soft Covers, Wire-O), we don’t think you’ll have a problem finding a notebook for each need of yours.

 ~~~

Meet the Writer: An avid list-maker and moderate risk taker, Kaylee Bergstrom handles all of the logistics for Whitelines North America and, having never heard of Whitelines prior to her current position, has become hooked on the unique design of the notebooks. Rarely spotted without a good tube of mascara, an A5 or pocket notebook and her Jack Russell / Shih Tzu puppy Russell, Kaylee enjoys spending her free time with friends and family, getting hooked on a good book series or catching a mind-bending thriller.

~~~

How to Write: Letter of Recommendation

12 Nov

How to Write: Letter of Resignation by Cole Imperi on EuropeanPaper.com/Blog The most important thing to keep in mind when writing a letter of recommendation is that you are writing to present new information; not to confirm information that is already available. Let’s go through some scenarios:

Recommendation Letters for Students

Many graduate-level education programs don’t highly consider recommendation letters that simply confirm information available in a student’s transcript. This means information like grades and test scores.

If your student has an A in your class, it’s best not to write something like:

“Student is very conscientious, arrives to class on time, has never missed a lesson and is 3 out of 67 students academically. He would be an excellent addition to your program.”

The above example is simply confirming what’s in the student’s transcript. One can easily tell this student is really good at being a student. But is that all they can do? Are they able to be anything else? The emphasis should be on their ability to apply their knowledge in the real world, and it should reference their enthusiasm and interest in whatever their course of study is.

Recommendation Letters for Employees & Interns

Your first step is to ask what the letter is for. Is this for another internship? If so, where? Or is this for admission into some sort of educational program? Your letter of recommendation will be more valuable if you are able to write it with an understanding of what its purpose is for.

Your letter should be concise and thorough. It’s actually OK to mention a weakness as long as you are emphasizing the positive. When mentioning a weakness like “She/he doesn’t always know when to ask for help,” be sure to end with a positive solution like “She/he doesn’t always know when to ask for help, but after we paired her/him with a senior-level manager to mentor them, we saw immense development of skills and ability. Their leadership skills grew as a result and their contribution to the team multiplied tenfold.”

A letter of recommendation for an employee is not a request to state that the employee showed up on time or did their job. It’s a request to understand more about the character and ability of the person. They want to know if this person is likely to persevere through difficulty, or give up. If they’re able to adjust to changes and adapt to new situations. If they can work with a wide range of personality types and still keep projects moving forward. They don’t want to hear that they took no sick days in 2012. They want to hear that the applicant is not only capable of working independently, but also able to ask if they’re unsure of something.

Recommendation Letters for Volunteers

A volunteer is special. They are giving up their most precious resource—time—to your cause or organization. Keeping that volunteer volunteering is vastly important. If they’re ready to move on from your organization, it’s your job to make sure they continue giving their time somewhere else. Volunteers are precious resources!

Writing letters of recommendation for volunteers should involve two things: statements about the volunteer’s character and information about your organization. Each organization or group that utilizes volunteer time is built differently. How your group is structured may not align with how another’s is. It’s important for the person reading the letters of recommendation to not only get a feel for the volunteer’s character, but also to understand the inner workings of your organization.

Recommendation Letters Are Not About You

It’s generally useful to provide a paragraph’s worth of information about yourself. How you know the person you are recommending and a little about how you interacted/worked with them. But that’s it. No need to get into specifics. The letter is about them, not about you.

How to Structure a Letter of Recommendation

Be formally concise. Your first paragraph is the statement of recommendation. Your second paragraph covers who you are and how you worked with the person being recommended. The next 1-3 paragraphs should each detail a specific example (all positive) of situations or events that clearly demonstrate certain aspects of the character of the person being recommended. Your final paragraph should serve to summarize: restate your strong recommendation on the basis of the person’s demonstrated strong character and positive attitude.

When NOT to Write a Letter of Recommendation

Simply, don’t write a recommendation letter for someone if you don’t mean it. You will waste their time and yours. If you need a way to decline writing a letter of recommendation, you can simply say that you do not have enough time to write an adequate letter.

~~~

Meet the Writer: Cole Imperi is a business owner and a proponent of the handwritten word. When not at Doth Brands, a Branding & Identity firm catering to the health, wellness & deathcare professions where Cole works as Owner and Creative Director, you might find her on her yoga mat teaching yoga or behind a laptop writing for Simplicity Embellished, a letter-writing and lifestyle blog.

~~~

Editor’s Note: This article is part of the How to Write series. Read the others here:

How to Write: Sympathy Notes

How to Write: Ideal Business Correspondence Notes

How to Write: Friendship / Appreciation Notes

How to Write: Thank You Notes

How to Write: With a Fountain Pen

How to Write: To a New Penpal

How to Maintain Your Pen Collection

How to Write: Improving Your Cursive Skills

How to Write: A Letter of Resignation

Staff Favorite: Moleskine Messenger Bag

6 Nov

Moleskine Messenger Bag on EuropeanPaper.com

A favorite of our CEO, Creative Designer, and Lead Programmer, among others, the Moleskine Messenger Bag brings the personality of the legendary notebook to the classic over-the-shoulder urban carryall. Robust and flexible piece to accompany your travels, whether near or far, the interior is lined in ivory faux-suede with a soft, luxurious feel, and also includes an “In case of loss” label sewn inside. A rear divider creates a separate back section; the front of the divider is covered in black terry fabric that attaches to Moleskine multi-purpose cases (sold separately). It can be used to carry any laptop computer with a screen size of up to 15-inch.

What’s your favorite carryall?

NEW from Palomino: Luxe Folio Cover + Sketchbook

31 Oct

Palomino Luxury Medium Sketchbook & Folio Cover (5 x 8.25) on EuropeanPaper.com

We’ve fallen head over heels for the new Palomino Luxury Medium Sketchbook & Folio Cover (5 x 8.25). It’s a fantastic, luxurious, and hip Folio Cover for Palomino sketchbooks that can be bought separate and inserted in the cover. The high quality, super soft faux leather cover also offers a place to store your writing tools, has a magnetic closure, and brings a strong presence to your office desk, in your briefcase or backpack, and at home.

  • Features holders for eight pencils (the Palomino Mixed Grade Graphite Set fits perfectly!), one eraser, and one sharpener.
  • Comes in a Palomino embossed gift box.
  • Easy to travel with to keep your essentials nearby.
  • Replaceable sketchbook has 96 acid-free pages of 120 gsm weight.

Learn Your Scales: Differentiating Between Pencil Graphite Grades

8 Oct

My students frequently ask me what the letters and numbers on the back of their pencils mean. The simple answer is that they refer to the graphite’s degree of hardness or softness. For this post I’ll write in general terms because many manufacturers use their own proprietary method of designation, and the letters can vary from company to company, and country to country. In America and in many European countries, the standard is that H designates a harder pencil, B designates a softer pencil, and an HB pencil is in the very middle of the spectrum of hard and soft.

Photo Courtesy of Leslie Herger for Pencil Grade Article for EuropeanPaper.com

Photo Courtesy of Less Herger

Most pencils that you buy for school or writing are usually an HB, even if that is not designated on their barrel. An HB pencil is very good for writing.  The lead sharpens quickly, and wears evenly, and is more difficult to break. In terms of pencil hardness, it’s middle-of-the-road. The coloration of the lead is that typical silvery gray color that comes to mind when you think of a pencil.

Stepping up the hardness a notch is an H pencil. These are a little bit harder than an HB pencil. When you apply the same pressure to an H and an HB pencil you will notice that the line of the H pencil is lighter than the HB pencil. Applying more pressure to the H pencil won’t make a darker line than an HB pencil.  An H pencil simply cannot lay down as much lead as a softer pencil. A 2H pencil makes an even lighter line.  Many brands of pencils have up to an 8H.  An 8H pencil produces a very light line, and wears at a very slow pace.

Why would one chose to use a harder pencil? A harder pencil wears more slowly than a softer pencil, the line doesn’t tend to smudge, but it erases with relative ease. The lighter line from a harder pencil is very useful to an artist who may want their initial sketch to disappear into their final media and not be seen or noticed. They are also a great choice if you want a pencil that writes smoothly but doesn’t smudge as easily as a softer pencil. One of the downsides to using a hard pencil is that it can leave an indent in the page if used with a lot of pressure.  This can make them more difficult to erase.

A grade B pencil is softer than an HB pencil. The lead tends to go onto the paper more smoothly and with less pressure. When more pressure is applied you can add a lot more graphite without gouging into the page. The B pencil is darker than the HB pencil. The B pencil is a useful tool for shading. A 2B pencil is even softer than the B pencil. Even less pressure is used to get darker areas of shading. Pencils can range up to an 8B or 9B in softness. An 8B pencil produces a very dark smooth line with very little pressure.

Photo Courtesy of Leslie Herger for Pencil Grade Article for EuropeanPaper.com

Photo Courtesy of Less Herger

Softer pencils are used by artists to get darker dark areas in drawings. If you are writing with softer pencils you will find you can write for a longer session with a B pencil as the graphite is smoother and takes less pressure to apply than an HB pencil. The trade-off is that the B pencil wears more quickly, requires more frequent sharpening, and smudges much more easily than the HB pencil.

Artists select their pencil types to best suit their individual artistic needs.  Watercolorists use a HB or H pencil with a light hand to allow them to lay down washes of color without the pencil interfering in the final piece. Someone using pencil as their main drawing tool might use 2H (hard) all the way up to 8B (soft) to avoid the glare that accompanies using heavy pressure with pencil.  An acrylic or oil painter, on the other hand, can use whatever pencil is handy or skip it for charcoal, which also comes in degrees of hardness and softness.  Either way, the paint will cover it up.

For fine detail work I use a KUM long point sharpener to bring my pencils to a long-wearing point that resists breakage. I find it works equally well on 2H all the way down to 6B pencils, which is not something I can say for every pencil sharpener.  If I’m going to be shading I’ll use a sharp craft knife to remove only the wood from my pencils.  I like to use a sharp H pencil to start my drawings, work very lightly, and then add additional areas of dark with progressively softer pencils. I discovered that process this process works for me through a lot of trial and error and experimentation over the years.

I encourage all of my students to play with their pencils, and get to know how they work. Through experimentation and time you’ll find a process of using the many grades of pencils that suit your individual artistic needs the best. Grab some pencils and a sketchbook and try them!

~~~

Meet the Writer: Less Herger is the owner and writer behind ComfortableShoesStudio.com and co-founder of PutitonPaper.org. She’s been making art for as long as she can remember and can’t imagine a day without her pen and ink.

~~~

How to Write: A Letter of Resignation

10 Sep

How to Write: Letter of Resignation by Cole Imperi on EuropeanPaper.com/BlogResigning from something – whether it’s a job or a volunteer position with a local non-profit – is an occasion that should be given some care and attention. In most cases, your letter of resignation will be kept on file permanently and is something that could potentially resurface in the future. Here are a few essential components to any good resignation letter and a few best practices as well.

1. Formatting

Format the resignation letter formally. If you use a word processor like Microsoft Word, you can use one of the pre-installed templates. There are several that will work; one in particular is called ‘Formal Letter.’ Use a heavier, decent paper when you print it off as well to add a more professional look.

2. Keep it Simple

There is no need to detail any specifics in a resignation letter. You might want to describe a situation or take time to write something a bit lengthier – don’t. Save that for your exit interview if you wish. If there is no exit interview, perhaps offering up those additional details would be better delivered in person verbally or through a thoughtful email. Ask yourself if anything more really needs to be said.

3. Include Basic Information

Make sure your full first and last name, current mailing address, date, the name of the company or organization you are resigning from, their address and your signature (in ink) are all listed in the letter.

4. List Your Resignation Date

It’s very important that you list the date your resignation will be effective. Whether you already told your employer in person is no matter, you need to have it in writing. If your employer has requirements for giving notice (the standard is two weeks), this letter will serve as proof that you gave enough notice.

5. Be Positive

Even if you are leaving on bad terms, it’s important to not be negative in your resignation letter. Imagine if a future employer saw this letter. Would they be left with a bad taste? If you are finding it hard to be positive, at the very least thank the company or the organization for the opportunity and leave it at that.

6. Offer to Help

Offer to assist in finding a replacement or to train your replacement. It’s important to show that you are a team player and are trying to avoid leaving the company in a lurch.

7. Clarify Final Duties

It is good practice to not only list your date of resignation, but to note that you need clarification on your final duties and any other final matters before you go. This helps the company or organization know that they need to figure out what is left as well. If you’ve already discussed your final duties and responsibilities, it would be appropriate to list those out in writing in your resignation letter.

Here’s the thing about resignation letters. You never know when – or how – you’ll cross paths with your former boss or coworkers in the future. The fact is, you may never, but the world is a very small place sometimes. If you leave anything in writing, make sure it’s positive and professional.

Below is a basic example of a resignation letter (click to enlarge). What experiences (positive or negative) have you had with resignation letters?

How to Write a Resignation Letter via EuropeanPaper.com/Blog

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Meet the Writer: Cole Imperi is a business owner and a proponent of the handwritten word. When not at Doth Brands, a Branding & Identity firm catering to the health, wellness & deathcare professions where Cole works as Owner and Creative Director, you might find her on her yoga mat teaching yoga or behind a laptop writing for Simplicity Embellished, a letter-writing and lifestyle blog.

~~~

Editor’s Note: This article is part of the How to Write series. Read the others here:

How to Write: Sympathy Notes

How to Write: Ideal Business Correspondence Notes

How to Write: Friendship / Appreciation Notes

How to Write: Thank You Notes

How to Write: With a Fountain Pen

How to Write: To a New Penpal

How to Maintain Your Pen Collection

How to Write: Improving Your Cursive Skills

Moleskine Folio Series

25 Apr

The Moleskine Folio Book Collection represents the largest Moleskine journals dedicated to creativity, free expression, and design. In fact, they’re huge! The Folio Collection is available in A4 and A3 sizes, offering generous space to be filled with drawings, projects and writings.

Like the Moleskine Classic Journals, Moleskine Folio Books have a sewn binding, acid-free paper, rounded edges, elastic closure, cloth ribbon placeholder, and a rear expandable inner pocket.

All paper used in the Moleskine Folio Collection is certified as responsibly harvested by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC).

Moleskine Folio A4 Ruled Notebook

  • 8.5 x 12 inches
  • 176 pages (88 leaves)
  • Sewn binding
  • Back pocket & cloth ribbon marker
  • Elastic closure
  • Acid-free paper
  • FSC certified paper
Moleskine Folio A4 Ruled Notebook (12 x 8.5) on EuropeanPaper.com
Moleskine Folio A4 Ruled Notebook (12 x 8.5)

 

Moleskine Folio A3 Plain Notebook

  • 16.5 x 12 inches
  • 176 pages (88 leaves)
  • 100 g/m2 paper
  • Sewn binding
  • Back pocket & cloth ribbon marker
  • Elastic closure
  • Acid-free paper
  • FSC certified paper
Moleskine Folio A3 Plain Notebook (16.5 x 12) on EuropeanPaper.com
Moleskine Folio A3 Plain Notebook (16.5 x 12)

 

See all Moleskine’s A4 and A3 Folio Notebooks, and while you’re there, check out the Moleskine Folio Office Series. Post-it notes, binders, folders, and so much Moleskine love.