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Tag Archives: stationery

Handmade Letterpressed Beauties : Brookfield Stationery

26 Jun

This is Art You Can Use. No tucking it away on a high shelf, no agonizing over whether it’s too fine to use:  does Aunt Joyce really deserve the nice stationery? The gorgeous patterns of Brookfield Letterpress Stationery are designed by Elisabeth Hyder, a former kindergarten teacher originally from Switzerland, and their vibrant colors and intriguing design mean this stationery is most definitely meant for Aunt Joyce, birthday parties, thank you notes, happy-to-see-you again notes and everyday invitations.

Elisabeth, who studied crafts as part of her teacher training, has always been an artist. Her husband and frequent collaborator, Darrell Hyder of The Sun Hill Press, has been a letterpress printer for over 40 years, working with both classic hand type and hot metal monotype.  As their four children grew and left home, Elisabeth settled more deeply into her craft and soon their home overflowed with her decorative paste paper and beautiful rubber stamp designs.  Together, she and Darrell have produced stationery, decorative papers, books and ephemera for years. Each year, Elisabeth designs new patterns for note cards as well as the cover designs for Sun Hill miniature books; together she and Darrell do all of the printing and editing of the OrangeArt Miniature Books.

Way back in the early 1990s, their good friends Carol and John, who are fine stationery manufacturers and wholesalers, asked if Darrell could create a letterpress sheet of Elisabeth’s stamps. Not only would they be beautiful papers for their customers, they thought, but they could be converted into a line of stationery for everyone to enjoy. And so it began. An enterprise rooted in friendship and beautiful products for all to enjoy.

Twenty years later their friendship and artistic collaboration continues strong, and we’re pleased to add their lovely work to our own pantheon of letterpress papers. Why do these products make people—including us—smile so much? Elisabeth’s patterns recall favorite fabrics, bookbinders’ tools, Japanese prints and the feel of depth is the result of rich, hand-mixed ink literally sunk into fine paper on heavy letterpresses by Darrell. The stationery products made by OrangeArt are useful as well as beautiful and are made entirely in New England .

Brookfield Stationery’s motto is “Art You Can Use.” Art that brightens every day, accompanies you to dinner parties and PTA functions, and brings some vibrant New England-Swiss beauty into your home.  While we love these for our own any-occasion correspondence, we’ve also found these notecards also make a great small gift perfect for hosts or hostesses, friendly neighbors, and the unexpected gift exchange. Even better, each stationery box has been wrapped with letterpress sheets to be refilled or re-purposed again: no wrapping required.

 

Shop Brookfield Letterpressed Stationery »

New Arrival : Original Crown Stationery

5 Jun

 

 

Original Crown Mill Stationery

Imported from Belgium
Deluxe stationery with a pop of color
10 laid finish cards
10 tissue lined envelopes
Write like a king… loved by royal courts dating back to the 17th century

The requests to bring on this fantastic stationery have poured in from all over. Finally, we’re happy to announce Original Crown Mill has arrived in a myriad of beautiful colors. If you love having a great note card on hand, and love the element of surprise with a lined envelope, Original Crown Mill is a must-have. Shop Original Crown Stationery»

Original Crown Mill Stationery : Write Like a King

4 Jun

An august lineage peppered with royal orders and paper-making monks?
Oh yes.

Original Crown Mill paper actually dates back as far as 1478 when the Holy Roman Emperor of the time, Emperor Maximilian I, granted the monks of the Belgian hamlet La Hulpe permission to build a mill on Grand Etang (Big Pond). They did and, bolstered by their close proximity to Brussels and the clear, pure waters of the ‘silver river’ L’Argentine, they thrived. The monastery quickly became a hub of fine paper-making, earning the Crown’s ultimate seal of approval when King Philip IV of Spain invested La Hulpe with the title “Imperial and Royal Paper Manufacture” in 1664.

Another two centuries on, and Belgium’s Industrial Revolution hit. Enter Frederic Pelletier who, in 1870, set out to preserve and continue the 17th handmade paper style. Since then, the venerable Pelletier company has produced this crisp laid finish paper to exacting standards of elegance, supplying the Belgian Royal Family (and the rest of us) with beautiful, evocative stationery.

Today, we’re thrilled to add this handsome, Vergé stationery to European Paper Company’s line up. The Silk Tissue Note Cards, with their laid paper envelopes and brightly colored lining add a distinguished frisson to your correspondence, invitations and thank you notes. If the luxury of pure cotton paper is more your style, indulge in our Correspondence A5 Pad and the matching C6 envelopes, lined with white tissue. You’ll find that Original Crown Mill paper is fountain pen friendly and perfect for pen pals and special occasions alike.

Shop Original Crown Mill Stationery »

Just In: New Colors of G. Lalo Mode de Paris Boxed Stationery

28 Mar

G. Lalo Mode de Paris Boxed Stationery (3.75 x 6) new colors (extra white, graphite grey, raspberry) on EuropeanPaper.com

Get them while they’re hot! New colors of the G. Lalo Mode de Paris Boxed Stationery just came in! The new colors are: Extra White, Graphite Grey, and Raspberry.

The luxe Mode de Paris stationery is perfect for expressing your sentiments in a memorable way. Elegant and classy, the Mode de Paris boxed stationery comes with 30 flat note cards and 30 matching lined envelopes for exceptional correspondence your family, friends, and penpals will want to keep at hand for years. Check out all G. Lalo Stationery here!

And a huge thank you to everyone at the Quo Vadis Blog for their wonderful shout-out to us yesterday – see it here!

Pull Out Your Finest Pens, Stationery & More: It’s Letter Writing Month!

1 Feb

February is Letter Writing Month! Accept the Challenge at EuropeanPaper.com

We’re psyched to begin February with news of two fabulous letter writing challenges from around the blogosphere!

  • First up is the Month of Letters Challenge (LetterMo.com) started in 2011 by novelist Mary Kowal
  • FPGeeks also created a “mail a day” challenge called International Correspondence Writing Month (InCoWriMo, which is inspired by NaNoWriMo if the acronym doesn’t sound familiar).

Both challenge websites have forums and more information, but the premise is simple: mail one thing per day over the course of the month. (Technically, LetterMo’s challenge is for you to send 23 pieces of mail, one per every day the postal service runs, while InCoWriMo’s challenge is 28 pieces of mail, one per day.) Whether you send a postcard, 5-page handwritten letter, mail art, or package is completely up to you.

Resources:

Have you written a blog post about Letter Writing Month or have another resource for us to list? Add it in the comments below and we’ll add it up here!

All Things French in Honor of Bastille Day

13 Jul


All French Paper Items on EuropeanPaper.com

Tomorrow, July 14th, is Bastille Day! ‘Bastille Day’ is the English term for the French National Day (a.k.a. La Fête Nationale), which commemorates the anniversary of the 1789 French Revolution when the modern people rose up against the monarchy. Akin to Independence Day in the U.S., Bastille Day highlights the importance of the new government after the uprising. Celebrate the day with a plethora of the finest French paper goods!

1) Clairefontaine Large Vintage Notebooks (5.75 x 8.25) (Set of 2)

2) J. Herbin Calligraphy Ink

3) Sennelier Esquisse D1 Drawing Pad (9.5 x 13.5)

4) Sennelier Calligraphy Pad (8.25 x 11.25)

5) Rhodia 2012-13 Academic Large Weekly Planner (6.25 x 9.5)

6) G. Lalo Verge de France Correspondence Sets (3.75 x 6)

7) Quo Vadis University #28 (No. 2801) Academic Planner Refill (4 x 6)

8) Clairefontaine Classic Pocket Side Spiralbound Notebook (3.5 x 5.5)

Check out all EuropeanPaper.com Brands from France: Clairefontaine, G. Lalo, J. Herbin, Quo Vadis, Rhodia, Sennelier

EPC Brands Made in the USA

29 Jun

Made in America!

These products have earned their stars & stripes …

Field Notes Pocket Mixed Notebook (Set of 3)

Noodler’s Bulletproof Inks (3 oz.) – Black

Mudlark Eco Kiko Memento Boxed Note Cards

Quotable Cards Live the Life Journal

Rite in the Rain Large Side Spiral Bound Notebook

Stillman & Birn Epsilon Side Spiralbound Sketchbook

Fisher Titanium Bullet Space Pen

NEW Amalfi 8-Count Note Card & Envelope Packs

30 May

Have you used Amalfi paper before? If so, you’ll be thrilled to hear it’s now available in grab-and-go personalized packs of eight note cards and eight envelopes! And if not, we’ve got a new set of note cards to introduce to you! We guarantee it will add a sparkle to your stationery collection.

Grab the luxurious Amalfi stationery you see and feel in wedding announcements and invitations in your own small set of 8 flat cards perfect for everyday correspondence. From one of the most renowned paper makers in Europe comes five sets of 8-count stationery packs. Simple sets of correspondence notes made by hand from the finest cotton since the 14th century. Their soft texture is incomparable and filled with elegance as each Amalfi note card and envelope is crafted with the utmost care, using many of the methods first developed in the Middle Ages. The deckled edge gives it a soft touch and makes it a superb choice in premium stationery to write on to your penpals, friends, family, and business contacts.

Check out the full brand story on our blog here to read all about Amalfi paper made by Cartiere Amatruda! Below are the NEW Amalfi 8-Count Note Card Sets.

Amalfi Informal Folded Notes (3.5 x 5.25 in.)

Amalfi Informal Folded Notes (8 ct.) (3.5 x 5.25) on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Informal Folded Notes on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Folded Notes (4.5 x 6.75 in.)

Amalfi Folded Notes (8 ct.) (4.5 x 6.75) on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Folded Notes on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Long Folded Notes (4.25 x 8 in.)

Amalfi Long Folded Notes (8 ct.) (4.25 x 8) on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Long Folded Notes on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Flat Cards (4.5 x 6.5 in.)

Amalfi Flat Cards (8 ct.) (4.5 x 6.5) on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Flat Cards on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Long Flat Cards (4.25 x 8 in.)

Amalfi Long Flat Cards (8 ct.) (4.25 x 8) on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Long Flat Cards on EuropeanPaper.com

See all Amalfi Stationery HERE!

Treat Yourself to Amalfi Stationery: A Centuries Old Delight

25 May

Amalfi Brand Story on EuropeanPaper.com

Luxurious Amalfi stationery, from one of the most renowned paper making centers in Europe, has been made by hand from the finest cotton for centuries. Its soft texture is incomparable and filled with elegance and character. Southeast from Naples, Italy, Amalfi is one of the oldest papermaking centers in Europe.

A Little Bit of Papermaking History

Paper mills in the Amalfi region actually have been traced back to as early as the 13th Century. As the demand for paper increased into the 15th Century the number of mills grew past the few local families who started the Amalfi papermaking trend. The industry boomed in the region and it quickly grew a reputation for high-quality cotton paper. The mid-1700s brought new manufacturing / machining processes, and sadly the decline of handmade paper began (peaking in the mid 1800s).

The classic Amalfi paper mills that had lasted for centuries in the region struggled for years against modern advances in papermaking and in 1954 were almost completely wiped out by a catastrophic flood. Out of the 16 paper mills in the area, three remained after the flood. The one we know and love today that goes by the name of “Amalfi Paper” on our site and is produced by Cartiera Amatruda, was saved by none other than Luigi Amatruda, a descendant of one of the oldest papermaking families on the Amalfi coast.

Amatruda Namesake

Amalfi Watermarked Stationery Set 20 count on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Watermarked Stationery Set 20 count on EuropeanPaper.com

Records of the Amatruda family actually date back to 1198 in Amalfi and the oldest Amatruda watermark comes from around the 14th century. Located on Italy’s Amalfi Coast, this stationery is still handmade by Cartiera Amatruda. The Amatruda paper mill is in the ancient Mill Valley of Amalfi, in a spectacular bridged position over the Canneto River. The first floor of the current longstanding Amatruda paper mill dates back to the 15th Century and the paper manufacturing tradition of the Amatruda family dates back to 1380.

Each naturally deckle-edged Amalfi sheet is handcrafted with the utmost care, using many of the original papermaking methods from the beginning of the Amatruda mill. Sized for the best possible writing quality, Amalfi paper is special in its depth of connecting the past with the present.

Finely Crafted Process

When the Amatruda family first opened their mill, they used cotton, linen, or hemp rags (today it’s 100% cotton), which were then put in stone tubs (also known as vats). The rags in the vats were pounded and reduced to pulp by a series of wooden mallets, working due to the power of the surrounding waterways.

A mould with a net of wires in the shape of the family’s watermark (usually in the middle) was then dipped in the tubs multiple times to form a sheet out of the pulp. After squeezing the water out and drying the sheets, papermakers would go over each piece to smooth out any imperfections and pick the most valuable cards.

Use Amalfi in All Occasions

Amalfi Folded Notes 8 count on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi Folded Notes 8 count on EuropeanPaper.com

Amalfi paper is best known for use in wedding invitations, life-cycle announcements, graduations, and other special events. Today however, we also offer it in personalized packs with 8 sheets and 8 envelopes of your choice between folded or flat cards. Perfect for everyday correspondence, the new 8-count individualized grab-and-go packs are the right amount for a touch of excellence.

With such an amazing history, Amalfi 100% cotton paper sheets and cards are a joy to give to family and friends, as well as to gift yourself with. To this day, Cartiere Amatruda keeps the papermaking process 100% natural, meaning no dyes, chemicals, or the like. As a favorite among letter writers, letterpress professionals, and stationery aficionados, we personally recommend Amalfi paper to anyone looking for an extra touch of elegance in their correspondence or special occasions.

Mudlark’s Balancing Act: Art & the Environment

26 Apr

Mudlark Brand Story on EuropeanPaper.com

Mudlark Papers is a family-owned company based out of Bolingbrook,Illinois. Founded in 1994 by Doug Hamilton, Mudlark makes artful and inspiring lifestyle products while remaining mindful to the environment. Their stationery products and accessories are made with sustainable and natural materials that live up to the standards of any true eco-friendly company. The calming balance of their products is unparalleled by most other stationery brands and begs to be shared with family, friends, and pen pals.

Note Card Nirvana

Mudlark Eco Coralina Memento Boxed Note Cards on EuropeanPaper.com

Mudlark Eco Coralina Memento Boxed Note Cards

The staple product at Mudlark are their beautiful boxed note card sets. These cards come in a set of 20 and all feature unique cover designs that are perfect down to every little detail. The blank cards are a perfect space to write a quick invitation, greeting, thank you, or reminder. Included in the set are 20 plain envelopes so you can send a note card to all of your friends and family. Each set comes in a matching keepsake box, a perfect complement to the note cards.

By now, we’re pretty sure an infinite amount of uses exist for the keepsake boxes, but here are a few ideas: Store your family’s secret recipes, favorite photos, personal notes, and mementos. It can also be used for storing office accessories, change, or small collectibles. The boxes even have an enlightening quote on the inside cover reminding us of little truths in life, such as “Keep your face always toward the sunshine and shadows will fall behind you.” by Walt Whitman. These sets are refined, artsy, and elegant while remaining really fun and useful. We also carry some Mudlark travel accessories for all you steadfast nomads traveling in style.

Sustainability

Mudlark Eco Clare de Lune Boxed Note Cards on EuropeanPaper.com

Mudlark Eco Clare de Lune Boxed Note Cards

While Mudlark already stands out stylistically, their environmental practices back up the earthy name of the brand. The beautiful thing is that Mudlark is not jumping on this trend; they have always operated this way because it is the right thing to do. Their stationery products are made from at least 80% post-consumer fibers. All inks printed on the products are soy-based, which requires less irrigation in the agricultural process and creates less pollution in the printing and recycling processes. Furthermore, their products are packaged in air pillows, cleverly avoiding the use of packing peanuts that are harmful to our environment.

The word sophisticated carries a heavy load of stigma … dare we use it? Absolutely, because Mudlark is sophisticated in the best ways possible: Cultured and refined, yet mindful and balanced. The act of writing becomes even more relaxing when all we can think to say is “Om.”

The Language of Stamps + Free Printable

13 Mar

The Victorians, at least the well-to-do variety, sure did have a lot of time to pay attention to details. They devised the use of Personal Calling Cards, the selection of flowers to send a certain message, and lots and lots of rules about etiquette. Even today, we are discovering (and reviving) Victorian traditions. For letter writing and mail enthusiasts, there is one in particular that has gotten notice in the last few years: The Language of Stamps.

Special EuropeanPaper.com stamps (not for postage use)

A few special stamps we mocked up for EuropeanPaper.com

Just as it was a Victorian tradition to select flowers based upon a message you’d like to send (the red rose equating to true love still exists today), there was a tradition of affixing a postage stamp to a letter in a certain way. Upside down, tilted left or tilted right, the direction and placement of the stamp said much more than ‘postage paid.’

Perhaps the most interesting part of the language of stamps is that there were no distinct rules. An upside down stamp might have meant one thing in the southern U.S., another in the northern U.S., and another in the UK. For all intents and purposes, the language of stamps was restricted to particular groups or regions. Even then, there is evidence that individuals and couples had their own private codes they used just between themselves.

Today, this tradition has made a resurgence (albeit a small one) with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Men and women writing to spouses serving overseas flip stamps upside down or in another direction to signify things like “I miss you” and “I love you.” The ‘codes’ in these letters are generally just between the letter writer and the recipient and there is by no means a true system out there today.

There is also a section of the US population that are avid letter writers who see value in reviving traditions like these. Major newspapers and popular websites have covered this very topic in recent years which has helped to draw more interest (and participation).

Communicating an additional message with a stamp is all about details. Not only is the letter writer taking time to write a letter, put pen to paper, fold it up, put it in an envelope and mail it, but they are going the extra mile in selecting the way the stamp is adhered to the envelope.

And, in case you ever wondered, if you place your stamp somewhere other than the upper right hand corner of your envelope, it will still get delivered. (However, if you do choose to place the stamp elsewhere on the front of the envelope, the letter might be slightly delayed due to the postage machines not able to scan it normally and therefore it will have to be handled manually.) In fact, this is the reason the original process of the recipient paying for the postage of a letter changed to the sender paying the postage. Senders would affix a stamp a certain way or put some other code on the exterior of the envelope or letter, and many times the recipient would get the message and decline paying postage on the note. Needless to say, word spread and the system was abused to the point that it was changed to where the sender pays the postage.


To encourage you to partake in the Language of Stamps tradition, attached to this article is an editable letterhead document you can download and print! Click the following link for a letterhead made specially for you to download and use –> EPC-Stationery-Hot-Air-Balloon-Editable

It is a PDF and features a hot air balloon in the bottom right hand corner. This particular image was lithographed in the Victorian era and is a rather appropriate subject for the sending of ‘air mail,’ no? After you download the letterhead, open it up in Adobe Acrobat (free) and click where the text appears. You can enter your own name or details for truly personal stationery. It prints two sheets to a standard sheet of 8.5” x 11” paper. Just cut right down the middle.

Interested in more reading? Here is a selection of articles and posts on the Language of Stamps you might be interested in:

From Love to Longing to Protest, It’s All in the Tilt of the Postage [New York Times article from 2005]

Blog post with lots of vintage ‘language of stamps’ postcards [by Rio Wang]

The Language of Stamps [post by Letter Writer’s Alliance]

The Language of Stamps [article on Philatelic Database]

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Meet the Writer: Cole Imperi is a business owner and a proponent of the handwritten word. When not at Doth Brands, a Branding & Identity firm catering to the health, wellness & deathcare professions where Cole works as Owner and Creative Director, you might find her on her yoga mat teaching yoga or behind a laptop writing for Simplicity Embellished, a letter-writing and lifestyle blog.

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Friday Blogger Tuck-ins

2 Mar

1 –>  Laurie at Plannerisms wrote a strongly worded post regarding the new trend in using Pinterest and why she adamantly is against it (and has requested all of her images to be removed from Pinterest). As more companies and individuals flock to the image-sharing site, she brings up a good conversation regarding privacy and copyright laws. What’s your take on it?

2 –> The Quo Vadis blog has some neat information (and time management tips) from Dr. FG Beltrami, “the founder of Quo Vadis and inventor of the Agenda planner with its one-week-on-two-pages layout” that you will want to read. Here’s Part 1 and Part 2.

3 –> TigerPens has a great post offering other writing instruments if you want a change, but don’t want a fountain pen particularly. Read it here.

4 –> As seen on This is Colossal ”Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper.”

5 –> Looking for a penpal? Check out Julie’s blog Penpal of the Week – each week she posts another person looking for a penpal to help people connect!

6 –> Check out some of the pages being created within the Webbies for the Rhodia Journal Swap! Several have been passed to the next person, are you one of them?

7 –>  We love that the Guardian featured an article titled “Why I Love Stationery” by Lucy Mangan. Here is an excerpt:  ”The right pen and the right paper brought into conjunction, runs the unspoken thought, cannot help but result in a sudden influx of bold, brilliant and original ideas, the germ of a bestselling novel that will in its turn be inscribed in another, perhaps larger notebook more worthy of the task, in sentences as creamy and beautiful as the pages on which they are written.” We’re just wondering why the image is of post-it notes on the author instead of … stationery, obviously.

8 –> Michael at Orange Crate Art shared this image originally “by the Illinois WPA Art Project for the WPA Statewide Library Project. Stamped March 25, 1941. From the Library of Congress’s online archive American Memory.”  We fell in love with it and just had to share. It’s time to whip out some books!